Pregnant women, older adults ‘mustn’t adopt’ viral fasting-mimicking diet

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Fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) involves a low-calorie, low-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet for 4 to 7 days

An alarm clock placed on a plate next to utensils representing the fasting-mimicking diet. — Pixabay
An alarm clock placed on a plate next to utensils representing the fasting-mimicking diet. — Pixabay

The fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) that has proven to reverse biological ageing by two and a half years has been taking the internet by storm but is it safe for everyone?

The fasting-mimicking diet was designed by Valter Longo, a professor at the University of South Carolina Leonard Davis School, and has been found to reduce biomarkers linked to insulin resistance, liver fat and ageing in humans, Medical News Today reported.

FMD involves consuming a low-calorie, low-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet for four to seven days.

Specialists have praised the new diet for its impressive results and the clinical consensus is that the FMD is generally safe, experts have warned two groups against following this diet.

“If you are pregnant or trying to conceive, and if you are considered an older adult, the FMD is not for you,” Dr Nicole Avena, nutrition consultant, and assistant professor of neuroscience at Mount Sinai School of Medicine said.

A pregnant woman has her hands wrapped around her belly. — Pixabay
A pregnant woman has her hands wrapped around her belly. — Pixabay

“During pregnancy, we have higher metabolic demand, and in old age, we do not have as fast of a metabolism as we do when we are younger,” she added.

During pregnancy, getting enough nutrients is essential for the health of the baby and parent.

An old man. — Unsplash
An old man. — Unsplash

For seniors, fasting is usually not recommended, especially if they already have chronic health issues.

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